Library and Information Science

Why You Won’t Have JSTOR When You Graduate and What You Can Do About It

Submitted by sacrissinger on February 23, 2017 - 12:49pm

These materials support a workshop for seniors on losing access to information after graduation. After a short lecture on why information costs money, we used each exercise, which focus on students making their work open, to encourage students to think critically about how their information sharing decisions impact others. We used three types of exercises--academic, creative, and work/corporate--to acknowledge that students are creators of multiple kinds of information.

Social Justice in Information- First Year Business Students

Submitted by svital on January 27, 2017 - 12:12pm

A 90 minute session with first year students in the School of Economics and Business Administration. Covered areas included overview of difficulties in searching and algorithm bias. Emphasis was on the importance to being critical consumers of information and understanding searches are not neutral.

Social Justice Role Playing Game: Net Neutrality Lesson Plan- Part 2

Submitted by lburgert on January 26, 2017 - 2:31pm

Students will participate in a game-based learning scenario based on Net Neutrality. Participants will each assume the role of an individual vested in the issue (Chairman of the FCC, President of the U.S., CEO of telecommunications company, or Supreme Court Justice). They will form alliances, discuss issues, formulate a strategy, and briefly share their viewpoint with the hope of winning the game. The learning experience is student lead.

Seeking Social Justice in Information | Graduate Counseling, Leadership and Education Students

Submitted by mbrownsa@stmary... on January 26, 2017 - 12:19pm

Created by M. Brown-Salazar Saint Mary's College of CA This lesson was developed to have graduate level students explore social justice issues in information found on the internet. It is based on Dr. Safiya Noble's work: Algorithms of Oppression. Simplified, we asked students to consider that when we seek information, we need to examine the perspective/privilege of the voices/sources of information and identify/understand whose voices are represented and whose voices are missing and how that impacts/influences our understanding.

Social Justice in Information | First Year: High Potential Students

Submitted by mbrownsa@stmary... on January 26, 2017 - 11:07am

Created by M. Brown-Salazar & G. Kessler Lee Saint Mary's College of Ca Library This lesson was developed to have students explore social justice issues in information found on the internet. It is based on Dr. Safiya Noble's work: Algorithms of Oppression. Simplified, we asked students to consider that when we seek information, we need to examine the perspective/privilege of the voices/sources of information and identify/understand whose voices are represented and whose voices are missing and how that impacts/influences our understanding. We used clips from a lecture by Dr.

Keepin’ It Real: Tips and Strategies for Evaluating Fake News

Submitted by Elisa on January 25, 2017 - 8:56pm

In an effort to provide students with an open space to learn about and discuss recent national concerns over “fake news,” the library offered four sessions of the workshop “Keepin’ It Real: Tips & Strategies for Evaluating Fake News” during a campus-wide Inauguration Teach-In on Friday, January 20, 2017. During this session, students had the opportunity to talk about how misleading news sources (encompassing misinformation, disinformation, click-bait, propaganda, etc.) have affected their views on civil discourse, specifically relating to the recent U.S. presidential election.

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