English

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MIT OpenCourseWare is a web-based publication of virtually all MIT course content. 

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Rewired: Research-Writing Partnerships within the Frameworks highlights the clear connections between two important disciplinary documents—the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing (CWPA, NCTE, and NWP, 2011) and the Framework for Informa

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The Information Literacy Assignment Bank is designed to support collaboration between librarians and faculty at College of the Holy Cross by providing a framework and a repository of concrete, but flexible, examples of the ways that information li

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Performance-based tasks and writing prompts that measure critical thinking and written communication skills. Addresses some information literacy skills. Administered online.

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The ETS® Proficiency Profile assesses four core skill areas: critical thinking, reading, writing, and mathematics--with a little bit of information literacy-- in a single test that the

Assignment

This group activity can be used in a variety of disciplines and contexts. Pass the Problem aims to have students provide feedback to other students on database and keyword selection. By having students critique each other it works to build critical self-reflection during the research process (it's also pretty fun!).

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Offers a diverse range of free K-12 classroom resources intended to complement teaching and encourage lifelong learning. Includes materials on interactive games, lesson plans, puzzles, videos, and contests.

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Offers educators more than 80,000 free learning activities for students in grades K-12 in a wide variety of academic subjects.

Teaching Resource

Rubric Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (RAILS) is an IMLS-funded research project designed to investigate an analytic rubric approach to information literacy assessment in higher education.  The RAILS project is intended to help academic

Assignment

Using ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher or similar database, groups of students work together to find and read four informative magazine articles representing a variety of opinions on a topic. For each magazine article they write an MLA citation. In an oral presentation of less than three minutes per group, they summarize the controversy without giving their own opinions and explain why they chose the four articles. Students are told to be prepared to answer questions about their topic and why they selected each of the four articles.

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