Rhetoric, Composition, and Writing

Teaching Resource

Two dozen teachers, librarians, administrators, and writing center professionals share their expertise and insights on successfully utilizing the frameworks for writing and information literacy. 

Teaching Resource

Blog with activities and assignments from the Oregon State University Libraries' Effective Research Assignments workshop. Categories include Audience, Topic Selection, Exploration, and Critical Reading & Evaluation.

Teaching Resource

Lion's Guide to Research & the Library was developed to meet the information literacy learning outcomes associated with Loyola Marymount University's First Year Seminar course.

Teaching Resource

Rewired: Research-Writing Partnerships within the Frameworks highlights the clear connections between two important disciplinary documents—the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing (CWPA, NCTE, and NWP, 2011) and the Framework for Informa

Assignment

As people rely more and more on social media to get their news, the filter bubble becomes increasingly problematic. In this workshop, students learn how to evaluate whether a news site is reliable. This group activity takes about 30 minutes and can be used for many different audiences by adjusting the examples used.

Teaching Resource

Performance-based tasks and writing prompts that measure critical thinking and written communication skills. Addresses some information literacy skills. Administered online.

Teaching Resource

The Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) is a nationally-normed assessment program from ACT which measures outcomes of the general education programs at the end of the first 2 years of college.

Teaching Resource

The ETS® Proficiency Profile assesses four core skill areas: critical thinking, reading, writing, and mathematics--with a little bit of information literacy-- in a single test that the

Teaching Resource

Rubric Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (RAILS) is an IMLS-funded research project designed to investigate an analytic rubric approach to information literacy assessment in higher education.  The RAILS project is intended to help academic

Assignment

Students write to communicate and their writing, when citing sources, must communicate what they understand of others’ writings. By asking students to write with the purpose of summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting a selected article to their classmate, they will experience what you experience when you read their writing. They will understand the purpose and mechanics of using sources in their writing. Activity is highly adaptable and suitable for independent readers high school and above. Activity can be modified for lower level learners.

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