Authority is Constructed / Contextual (Frame 1)

Assignment

P.R.O.V.E.N. is designed to provide students with a list of source evaluation questions that are grounded in the ACRL Framework. The "PROVEN" acronym emphasizes the process students should go through to demonstrate credibility based on their particular needs, rather than the state of a particular source (i.e. credible or not).

Assignment

In this activity, students will work on maintaining eye contact with their audience while giving an impromptu speech. The goal is to stop (or reduce) students' tendency to look at their visual aid during speech presentations.

Assignment

This resource and accompanying assignment focuses on evaluating news sources/claims and were used in an online information literacy class.

Assignment

As part of a larger news evaluation campaign, Sara Davidson Squibb and colleagues (Lindsay Davis, Elizabeth McMunn-Tetangco and Elizabeth Salmon) created a jigsaw lesson to use with introductory writing courses. Students were asked to evaluate an article’s content, tone, and purpose in a large group before they discussed the article in the context of two other articles on the same topic in a smaller group. After these group discussions, the library instructor revealed the source of each news article and highlighted resources and strategies for learning more about news sources.

Assignment

Katelyn Burton (kburton@virginiawestern.edu) created the framework for this lesson plan while an Instruction Librarian at Radford University, a jigsaw comparing four different sources. Katelyn and Alyssa Alyssa worked with Dr. Michele Ren's Women's and Gender Studies 200 class at Radford. Dr. Ren asked for something related to global women's issues.

Assignment

In this workshop, students learn about the driving forces behind fake news, reflect on how our opinions impact the way we evaluate information, and discuss and practice using criteria for evaluating news. The workshop includes a brief presentation on fake news and cognitive biases, reflection prompts for students to respond to, and an activity in which students work in groups to evaluate different news articles on a common topic.

Assignment

A gallery walk is a silent, interactive exercise followed by small- or whole-group discussion. You can use this exercise to introduce students to new material, to review previously-introduced material, or to assess teaching and/or learning.

Assignment

Students in an introductory Women's and Gender Studies course are required to critically analyze and edit an article in Wikipedia. Through class discussion and an active learning exercise, students begin to understand how and why women and many racial groups and individuals are underrepresented or systematically marginalized in Wikipedia. Students learn how to use the "Talk" tab to evaluate Wikipedia articles and learn about authority and power structures within that community.

Assignment

This assignment is a non-partisan way to interrogate the way the 45th POTUS uses Twitter using the concepts of Metaphor and Enthymeme. The assignment could be altered to focus on any Twitter handle or trending hashtag. The teacher should give a short 15 minute introduction the concepts and then break students up into small groups to decipher Tweets. The last portion of class is for group presentation/discussion of students findings.

Assignment

A 90 minute session with first year students in the School of Economics and Business Administration. Covered areas included overview of difficulties in searching and algorithm bias. Emphasis was on the importance to being critical consumers of information and understanding searches are not neutral.

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