Library and Information Science

What's Happening? Evaluating News in a Time of Information Overload

Submitted by Kim Pittman on April 4, 2017 - 2:11pm

In this workshop, students learn about the driving forces behind fake news, reflect on how our opinions impact the way we evaluate information, and discuss and practice using criteria for evaluating news. The workshop includes a brief presentation on fake news and cognitive biases, reflection prompts for students to respond to, and an activity in which students work in groups to evaluate different news articles on a common topic.

Why You Won’t Have JSTOR When You Graduate and What You Can Do About It

Submitted by sacrissinger on February 23, 2017 - 12:49pm

These materials support a workshop for seniors on losing access to information after graduation. After a short lecture on why information costs money, we used each exercise, which focus on students making their work open, to encourage students to think critically about how their information sharing decisions impact others. We used three types of exercises--academic, creative, and work/corporate--to acknowledge that students are creators of multiple kinds of information.

Social Justice in Information- First Year Business Students

Submitted by svital on January 27, 2017 - 12:12pm

A 90 minute session with first year students in the School of Economics and Business Administration. Covered areas included overview of difficulties in searching and algorithm bias. Emphasis was on the importance to being critical consumers of information and understanding searches are not neutral.

Social Justice Role Playing Game: Net Neutrality Lesson Plan- Part 2

Submitted by lburgert on January 26, 2017 - 2:31pm

Students will participate in a game-based learning scenario based on Net Neutrality. Participants will each assume the role of an individual vested in the issue (Chairman of the FCC, President of the U.S., CEO of telecommunications company, or Supreme Court Justice). They will form alliances, discuss issues, formulate a strategy, and briefly share their viewpoint with the hope of winning the game. The learning experience is student lead.

Pages