Rhetoric, Composition, and Writing

Teaching Resource

Teaches students the rhetorical moves found in persuasive writing across all disciplines.

Assignment

This is designed to introduce students to the wonderful world of periodicals, in their great variety, and to how they will appear in different databases. It also begins the work of building their skills at evaluating information sources, determining perspective.

Assignment

This exercise was designed for 1st year writing students with several different goals in mind:
• encourage deeper, closer reading;
• introduce the concept that information sources have perspective;
• develop vocabulary around describing information and perspective;
• acquaint students with the many values/uses of subject encyclopedias;
• practice topic narrowing using these types of encyclopedia articles.

Assignment

This is a 65-minute workshop designed for 1st year composition students who will be using periodical sources in their research. Students will practice writing contextualizing statements, e.g. describing authors, genres, types of periodicals, for a variety of information sources of the type they will be using in their own research projects.

Assignment

This concept map and activity explores how various sources of information are created, accessed, and shared. Students collaboratively define what makes a source traditional, emerging, public, or exclusive. Students are given a type of information source to map on the grid according to each axis, and provide a rationale for their placement.

Assignment

In this exercise students use the Voyant word analysis tool to analyze Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time. (Any literary work would work.)

Assignment

As part of the research process, students need to learn how to organize and synthesize their sources. This short lecture, followed by a matrix outline given to every student, gives students the opportunity to focus their research question even more and to add their own ideas to the conversation of research within their chosen topic.

Assignment

This lesson, created for English 2010, or Argumentative Writing, teaches students how to use library databases and keywords in order to focus their research topics. Most students come prepared with a general or broad topic in mind, but they need to narrow their focus in order to get more relevant search results. Here they simultaneously learn to search in and use the library databases and to focus their research topics.

Teaching Resource

Article by Renee Hobbs and Sandra McGee that traces the origins of teaching and learning about propaganda, examining some instructional materials produced in the 1930s by the Institute for Propaganda Analysis (IPA).

Assignment

In this lesson students view a series of short videos about searching library resources, interspersed with exercises in which they conduct searches on their topics and reflect on what they find and on the research process. (The first two videos and accompanying activities are done outside of class; the third can be done in class.)

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